A Namesake To Be Proud Of

A Namesake To Be Proud Of

I've always been so proud to live in the Greater Cincinnati area - I love it's culture, it's people, it's architecture, and it's history. With that in mind, I'd like to share a snippet of Cincinnati's history with my readers.

Cincinnati, OH was named to honor Cincinnatus, a Roman Statesman, who lived from 519 BC – 430 BC. There is a statue of him at Sawyer Point, and this blog entry's photo of it can be credited to drc.libraries.uc.eduHere is the scoop, for those who don’t know who this man was or what it was that he actually did, as sourced from Wikipedia and edited for brevity by me:

In 458 BC, the Romans were fighting the Aequi and the Sabines. The consul Minucius Esquillnus had led an army against them, but had been trapped by the Aequians in the Alban Hills and was attempting to fight off a siege. A few Roman Horseman escaped and returned to Rome to tell the senate what had happened.

The senate fell into a panic and authorized the other consul for the year, Horatius Pulvillus, to nominate a dictator. Horatius nominated Cincinnatus for a dictatorial term (also known as Magister Populi or "Master of the People") for six months.
A group of senators were sent to tell Cincinnatus that he had been nominated dictator.

According to Livy, the senators found Cincinnatus while he was plowing on his farm. Cincinnatus cried out "Is everything all right?" They said to Cincinnatus that they hoped "it might turn out well for both him and his country," and then they asked him to put on his senatorial toga and hear the mandate of the senate. He called to his wife, Racilia, telling her to bring out his toga from their cottage.


When he put on his toga, the senatorial delegation hailed him as dictator, and told him to come to the city. He then crossed the Tiber River in a boat provided by the senate, as his farm was on the far side of the river. The next morning, Cincinnatus went to the Roman forum and nominated as his Master of the Horse (his second in command) Lucius Tarquitius, who was considered one of the finest soldiers in Rome. Cincinnatus then went to the Roman popular assembly and issued an order to the effect that every man of military age should report to the Campus Martius—the Field of Mars, god of war—by the end of the day. Once the army assembled, Cincinnatus took them to fight the Aequi at the Battle of Mons Algidus.

Cincinnatus led the infantry in person, while Tarquitius led the cavalry. The Aequi were surprised by the double attack and were soon cut to pieces. The commanders of the Aequi begged Cincinnatus not to slaughter them all.[7]
Cincinnatus did not want to cause any unnecessary bloodshed, and told the Aequi that he would let them live if they submitted to him and brought their leader, Gracchus Cloelius, and his officers to him in chains. A yoke was set up, made up of three spears, and the Aequi had to pass under it, bowing down while confessing that they had been conquered.

After this, the war ended and Cincinnatus disbanded his army. He then resigned his dictatorship and returned to his farm, a mere fifteen days after he had been nominated dictator.


He came out of retirement again for a second term as dictator (439 BC) to put down a conspiracy of Spurius Maelius, who supposedly was planning to become king. He was nominated by his old friend and relative, Titus Quinctius Capitolinus Barbatus, consul of the year. Maelius was killed immediately when the Master of the Horse was sent to bring him to trial and the incipient coup perished with him. Once more he resigned his commission.


Within his lifetime Cincinnatus became a legend to the Romans. Twice granted supreme power, he held onto it for not a day longer than absolutely necessary; Talk about humility!!!
   


Lynn Murphy Dickerscheid Headshot
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Phone: 513-885-1673
Dated: May 14th 2014
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